Contending Like Beckham

The 6th Exercise & Sport Science Australia and Sports Dieticians Australia conference 'Research to Practice' is to be held in Adelaide from April 10 to 12. Image Credit: ESSA Website

 

The 6th Exercise & Sport Science Australia and Sports Dieticians Australia conference 'Research to Practice' is to be held in Adelaide from April 10 to 12. Image Credit: ESSA Website

 

The 6th Exercise & Sport Science Australia and Sports Dieticians Australia conference ‘Research to Practice’ is to be held in Adelaide from April 10 to 12.

(Image Credit: ESSA Website)

Tamara Woolley’s soccer-based Honours research project is a ‘keeper’.

By Gabrielle Vacher

Bachelor of Sport & Exercise Science graduate Tamara Woolley is the first JCU student to be selected as a finalist for the Aspire Academy Young Investigator Award.

Tamara was chosen after submitting an abstract of her soccer-based Honours research project to the Committee of the Research to Practice conference to be held in Adelaide from April 10 to 12.

Her Honours project and contending presentation is titled ‘The Effect of Spatial Manipulation on Goalkeepers’ Anticipation of a Penalty Kick in Soccer’.

“It’s basically a study about the eye movements of a goalkeeper, observing where they’re looking when they’re trying to block the soccer ball from the goal, and then analysing how they can improve,” Tamara says.

Research to Practice is a biennial event organised by Exercise & Sports Science Australia and Sports Dieticians Australia, and is seen as an exceptional opportunity for both students and graduates to aid with professional development and networking.

The three-day conference implements a strong scientific program comprised of expert panels, interactive sessions, workshops, and presentations regarding Sports Science, Exercise Science, Nutrition, and Exercise is Medicine.

It attracts a number of high-level speakers, national exhibitors and representatives from multiple health associations.

JCU lecturer and Honours supervisor Robert Crowther encouraged Tamara to apply for the award.

“No JCU Sport & Exercise student has made the finalists or been nominated, it is quite a new award,” Robert says.

“Tamara will be up against some strong competition, but her topic is novel and it should be a good presentation.”

Of the nine awards bestowed at Research to Practice, the Aspire Academy Young Investigator Award is open to both current university students and students enrolled in the 2013 calendar year, granting $4000 prize money to the winner and $1000 to the runner-up.

A well-regarded committee has been appointed to undertake the judging of the finalist’s presentations on the basis of scientific quality, novelty, and potential impact.

“I am pretty nervous about speaking and presenting in front of such a massive crowd, but having the opportunity to further my studies and interact with such a wide range of professionals in my field will definitely make the experience worthwhile,” Tamara said.

To find out more about the Research to Practice conference, head to: Exercise Sports and Science Australia.